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Equine Biosecurity

Biosecurity means:

Keeping your horses healthy through disease prevention;

protecting yourselves, your horses, and your property from disease-causing agents and the introduction of disease

reducing and controlling the spread of disease

Remember to always contact your veterinarian with with any biosecurity or horse health questions and concerns. Biosecurity Resources

Manitoba Horse Council (MHC) hopes to develop and customize its own biosecurity materials for Manitoba equestrians. Presently, fellow provincial equestrian organization Alberta Equestrian Federation has developed some excellent resources in conjunction with the Alberta Veterinary Medical Association. Please view the following while keeping in mind some information will differ from province to province:

Equine Biosecurity and Best Practices Guide

Biosecurity Brochure Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs)

SOPs help ensure everyone who is using a facility and/or engaged in a horse's care is aware of the biosecurity ...

 

Education

Manitoba Horse Council A Partnership in Training & Certification

Manitoba Horse Council (MHC) is partnering with Equine Guelph to provide our members short, easily-accessible training programs so you can stay up-to-date on the latest information on equine care and welfare. This partnership enables the MHC to offer continuing education and certification opportunities for our members – athletes, coaches, officials, recreational riders/drivers, facility owners and professional equine care-givers. Sign up for these inaugural short courses: Equine Biosecurity – Canada’s standard : Apr 10 – Apr 28 Equine Welfare – Canada’s Code : Mar 6 – Mar 24

10% DISCOUNT FOR MANITOBA HORSE COUNCIL MEMBERS

$95.00 | $85.50 with MHC Member discount

Every single person who is responsible for a horse should have a basic knowledge of Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Equines as well as the new Equine Biosecurity standard .

These short courses qualify for ...

 

Horse Health and Welfare

Emergency Plans Biosecurity Premises ID Codes of Practice for the care and handling of farm animals

The Codes of Practice are nationally developed guidelines for the care and handling of farm animals. The Codes serve as our national understanding of animal care requirements and recommended practices. NFACC and the Codes

Canada’s Code development process is led by NFACC. Key components of the process are: the inclusion of scientific committees to review research on priority welfare issues; ownership of the individual Codes by the relevant stakeholders through their active participation in developing the Code; measurable components to facilitate the development of assessment programs; and a transparent process. Science- and consensus-based commitment

The Code Development Committee and the Scientific Committee work together to develop a science- and consensus-based Code. The result is a Code that is scientifically informed, practical, and reflects societal expectations for responsible farm ...

 

Manitoba Equestrian Championships

MEC (Manitoba Equestrian Championships)

Will be held on September 22nd - 24th, 2017 at the Bird's Hill Park Equestrian Facility.

See Manitoba’s best equestrians compete for the coveted title of "Manitoba Champion"!

Representatives from all regions of Manitoba will compete in Barrel Racing, Combined Driving, Competitive Trail, Cutting, Dressage, Endurance, Eventing and Show Jumping in their quest to become Manitoba Champions.

All details on events and qualifications will be listed in Prize List so please review it when available.

If any questions contact Carolyn by phoning 204.925.5719 or email [email protected]

 

Becoming a Coach

How to Become an NCCP Certified Equestrian Coach or Instructor STEP 1 - Identify the certification you are best suited for

Instructor : Specializes in introducing beginners to non-competitive or recreational riding and/or driving.

Available certificates: Instructor English Western Driving Saddle Seat

Please note : NCCP Certified Instructors may maintain amateur competitive status while receiving remuneration for instructing.

Coach : Specializes in working with athletes actively competing in equestrian sport. This stream allows a coach to progress through competitive levels and specialize in a discipline.

Available certificates: Competition Coach English Western Competition Coach Specialist Dressage Eventing General Performance Jumping Reining Speed Events High Performance 1 Coach Dressage Eventing Jumping Reining STEP 2 - Complete the admission requirements

The general admission requirements for all certification programs are as follows: Current First Aid Certificate Police ...

 

Competition Organizers

Equine Canada Sanctioned Competitions

The following Bronze and Silver competitions are approved by each province or territory.

1. Hunter/Jumper Competitions 2. Dressage Competitions 3. Breed Competitions 4. Endurance Competitions 5. Reining Competitions

*All Platinum, Gold, Bronze/Gold or Silver/Gold competitions are approved by EC.

**All Eventing, Driving and Vaulting competitions are approved by EC

*** Competitions are not permitted to host multiple disciplines at a single competition, unless permission is granted by EC. E.g. A dressage competition may not hold a hunter/jumper portion unless given written permission from EC.

**** It is important to note that all Manitoba Bronze and Silver EC Sanctioned Shows/Competitions are to contact the MHC office directly. // WE HAD UPDATED ALL FORM LINKS BELOW TO THE 2016 VERSIONS, BUT NOW DUE TO THE REBRANDING AND NEW WEBSITE SWITCH OVER BY EQUESTRIAN CANADA, MANY OF THE LINKS BELOW ARE NO LONGER WORKING. WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO UPDATE THEM BUT ...

 

Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships (CIEC)

What is the CIEC?

The Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships is a sanctioned Equine Canada competition. This team event offers athletes in the Learning and Training to Compete and the Learning and Training to Win stages within the Long-Term Equestrian Development (LTED) model, the opportunity to test their skills against their peers from across Canada.

Recognized as a pilot project, the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships is a collaborative event between the national and provincial sport organizations governing equestrian competition, whereby provincial/territorial sport organizations field teams representing their respective province/territory. It also acts a key event in the development of equestrian’s next generation of national, international and world champions. In addition, it is a platform for talent identification for athletes, coaches and officials.

Equine Canada (EC) and the Provincial and Territorial Sport Organizations (PTSOs) have made the joint ...

 

MANITOBA HORSE COUNCIL ANNOUNCES THE 2015 COACH OF THE YEAR - GAETANE MANAIGRE

Gaetane is a very successful Equestrian and Coach. In 2015 she won a number of provincial and gold championships. She also won Equine Canada Horse and Rider awards in 2015. At the Dressage Winnipeg Awards ceremony she was recognized with the Hi-Point awards for Training, Third and Fourth levels, and gold medals of excellence for Training, First, Third and Fourth levels. She also received the Gi llian Sevier Award for the senior with the highest percentage result.

Gaetane is a very dedicated and hard working coach who always has the best interests of her students in mind when she works with them. She is a skillful teacher who is both encouraging and patient as students develop their abilities. The results of her work are shown in the high level of success of her students. It is to her credit that she also knows when to refer them to other coaches to further develop their expertise with horses.

Gaetane is also well known for her concern over the welfare of the horse. Her passion for horses has been ...

 

MANITOBA HORSE COUNCIL ANNOUNCES THE 2016 COACH OF THE YEAR - DANAE MARTIN

Good teaching is the core strength of our sport. Everyone, from Recreation Enthusiasts to High Performance Athletes, can and do benefit from excellent coaches.

Danae was nominated for this award, and recognition, by members who are connected with two different Manitoba Horse Council clubs. Her nominations were filled with positive comments about her commitment to the sport, her dedication to helping others be the "best they can be" and her personal skill level!

Danae has been a powerful influence on many levels. She sits on the Manitoba Horse Trials board, the Manitoba Horse Council board and she works tirelessly to assist Equestrian Canada in the development and implementation of high coaching standards for the sport.

Her coaching ability shows clearly in her results. Danae consistently has students who achieve High Point Awards in their area of choice when it comes to awards evenings. A number of Danae's Eventing students actively compete in the USA to further their showing experience and to ...

 

MHC PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE - MAY 18, 2016

I am informing our membership and friends that by mutual agreement Diane Shack will no longer be the Executive Director of the Manitoba Horse Council. MHC thanks her for her service and wishes her all the best in her future endeavours. In the near future MHC will begin a search for a new ED. In the meantime Brenda Neumann will work more hours and Carolyn Lintott will be our interim ED.

MHC will make every effort to have someone in the office from 9 until 4 from Monday to Friday to answer your questions. If you have questions for the office or for any of the directors please email the office at [email protected] Questions best answered by a director will be passed on to the relevant person.

We are very excited to have approved the new board for the coming year. They are as follows: Geri Sweet - President Jan Ash Gross - Athlete Development Gwen Donohoe - Breeds & Industry Myriam Dyck - Marketing Linda Hazelwood - Secretary-Treasurer Lisa Rosin - Member At Large Harry Crawley - Equestrian ...

 

Western Riding

Western riding in North America originated from the Spanish conquistadors in the 17th Century. As the conquistadors traveled to what is now Texas and California, this style of riding began to spread across the continent.

Both equipment and riding style evolved to meet the working needs of the cowboy in the American West. American cowboys needed to work long hours in the saddle over rough terrain, sometimes needing to rope cattle with a lariat (or lasso). Because of the necessity to control the horse with one hand and use a lariat with the other, western horses were trained to neck rein, that is, to change direction with light pressure of a rein against the horse's neck. Horses were also trained to exercise a certain degree of independence in using their natural instincts to follow the movements of a cow, thus a riding style developed that emphasized a deep, secure seat, and training methods encouraged a horse to be responsive on very light rein contact. Though there are significant differences in ...

 

Getting Started

LEARNING TO RIDE – FIRST STEPS

So your child loves horses and has expressed a desire to ride? Or maybe you as adult want to start the sport of equestrian and you are not sure where to begin? You don’t have to incur the expenses of buying and boarding a horse to learn to ride. Taking lessons at a facility which offers school horses can be the best way for you and yours to begin their equestrian journey. Choosing a riding facility can seem like a daunting task but there are things you can look for and questions you can ask to help you make an informed decision.

For a listing of some facilities which offer lessons in Manitoba, you can go to www.manitobaequinedirectory.ca and look through the businesses listed there to see which ones offer school horses or beginner programs. (MHC cannot recommend any particular facility - see our Help Me Find a Coach page for more tips on choosing a riding facility)

Find out about the lesson program and the credentials of the instructors/coaches teaching ...

 

Learn To Ride

What is Equestrian? Getting Started P'tit Trot Program Beginning Riding Lessons English Riding Western Riding Other Disciplines Upcoming Learn to Ride Events

Learning to Ride

So your child loves horses and has expressed a desire to ride? Or maybe you as adult want to start the sport of equestrian and you are not sure where to begin?

You don’t have to incur the expenses of buying and boarding a horse to learn to ride.

Taking lessons at a facility which offers school horses can be the best way for you and yours to begin their equestrian journey.

Choosing a riding facility can seem like a daunting task but there are things you can look for and questions you can ask to help you make an informed decision. Our downloadable Guide for New Riders now available! Click to download PDF version or request a hard copy from the office. Please use the links above to get more information on how to get started on your horse journey... Further questions can be directed to the MHC office at (204) ...

 

Beginning Riding Lessons

WHAT TO WEAR TO YOUR FIRST RIDING LESSON

While it isn’t necessary to go out and purchase a full riding wardrobe for your first lesson, there are a few must haves which will make your experience safe, comfortable and fun.

ASTM CERTIFIED RIDING HELMET

This is the single most important piece of equipment you need to own. Approved ASTM riding helmets must be properly fitted to the rider so they don’t slip or fly off during riding. Riding helmets are designed specifically for riding and the types of injuries a rider could experience. Substituting a non- sport specific helmet such as a hockey helmet is NOT recommended and is to be avoided. Borrowing or purchasing a used helmet which could have structural damage not visible to the eye should be avoided. A reputable tack shop will carry certified helmets and will be able to assist you in selecting a properly fitting helmet.

PROPER FOOTWEAR

While wearing a pair of riding boots is a good idea they are not essential. Wear shoes/boots ...

 

Athlete Development

Athlete Development Grants Athlete Development Resources

Horses inspire, motivate, engage and reward us. The Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) & Long Term Equestrian Development (LTED) models strives to cement the lifelong relationship between horse and athlete. As models, LTAD and LTED provides the Canadian equestrian community with a vision to help us improve our infrastructure, programs and initiatives to ensure the best opportunities are available for all athletes and participants – whatever their personal goals or stage of development. It serves as our true north. Long-Term Athlete Development

Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) is a systemic approach being developed and adopted by Equestrian Canada to maximize a participant/athletes potential and involvement in our sport. The LTAD framework aims to define optimal training, competition and recovery program based on biological age rather than chronological age. It is athlete centered, coach driven and administration, sport science ...

 

Terms of Service

This is our current Terms of Service, last updated 20 December 2016