Search Results for english

 

English Riding

English riding is a form of horse riding seen throughout the world. There are many variations, but all feature a flat English saddle without the deep seat, high back or saddle horn seen on a Western saddle nor the knee pads seen on an Australian Stock Saddle. Saddles within the various English disciplines are all designed to allow the horse the freedom to move in the optimal manner for a given task, ranging from classical dressage to horse racing. English bridles also vary in style based on discipline, but most feature some type of noseband as well as closed reins, buckled together at the ends, that prevents them from dropping on the ground if a rider becomes unseated. Clothing for riders in competition is usually based on traditional needs from which a specific style of riding developed, but most standards require, as a minimum, boots; breeches or jodhpurs; a shirt with some form of tie or stock; a hat, cap, or equestrian helmet; and a jacket. English riding is an equestrian discipline with many different ...

 

Equine Industry Job Postings Manitoba

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Overview:

The Manitoba Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association (“HBPA”), located at 3975 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3K 2E9, is looking for:

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Job Title: Horse Grooms

Term: The position is a full time temporary position for the 2019 season starting from March 1, 2019 to approximately September 9, 2019.

Horse Grooms Job Duties: -Provide daily care of horses racing at Assiniboia Downs at 3975 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3K 2E9; -Assist horse trainer with thoroughbred horse training duties -Cleaning stalls, tacking horses, horse grooming, applying medications and bandaging; -Mixing and preparing feed, detecting disease or ailments and reporting to horse owners

Hours: 35 hours per week

Experience Required -Must have on track race horse experience; -Must be able to provide a Criminal Record Check;

Language of Work: English

Wage: $13.50 / hour -no formal education required -accommodations available on ...

 

Getting Started

LEARNING TO RIDE – FIRST STEPS

So your child loves horses and has expressed a desire to ride? Or maybe you as adult want to start the sport of equestrian and you are not sure where to begin? You don’t have to incur the expenses of buying and boarding a horse to learn to ride. Taking lessons at a facility which offers school horses can be the best way for you and yours to begin their equestrian journey. Choosing a riding facility can seem like a daunting task but there are things you can look for and questions you can ask to help you make an informed decision.

For a listing of some facilities which offer lessons in Manitoba, you can go to www.manitobaequinedirectory.com and look through the businesses listed there to see which ones offer school horses or beginner programs. (MHC cannot recommend any particular facility - see our Help Me Find a Coach page for more tips on choosing a riding facility)

Find out about the lesson program and the credentials of the instructors/coaches teaching ...

 

Becoming a Coach

How to Become an NCCP Certified Equestrian Coach or Instructor STEP 1 - Identify the certification you are best suited for

Instructor : Specializes in introducing beginners to non-competitive or recreational riding and/or driving.

Available certificates: Instructor English Western Driving Saddle Seat

Please note : NCCP Certified Instructors may maintain amateur competitive status while receiving remuneration for instructing.

Coach : Specializes in working with athletes actively competing in equestrian sport. This stream allows a coach to progress through competitive levels and specialize in a discipline.

Available certificates: Competition Coach English Western Competition Coach Specialist Dressage Eventing General Performance Jumping Reining Speed Events High Performance 1 Coach Dressage Eventing Jumping Reining STEP 2 - Complete the admission requirements

The general admission requirements for all certification programs are as follows. Once completed, please submit the originals ...

 

Coaching Certifications

NCCP

The National Coach Certification Program (NCCP) is a coach training and certification program for all coaches in nearly 70 sports and is the recognized standard for coach training and certification in Canada. The NCCP is implemented by the Coaching Association of Canada (CAC). The NCCP is the only coach program accepted by Coaching Manitoba – the Sport Manitoba unit for coaching in Manitoba – as required under the CAC. Equestrian Canada/NCCP

The Equestrian Canada (EC) coaching program is the nationally recognized certification program for equestrian coaches and instructors, developed in partnership with the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), the Coaching Association of Canada (CAC) and Sport Canada. Equestrian Canada certification approves and acknowledges equestrian coach/instructors’ teaching and coaching skills as meeting professional, nationally, and internationally recognized standards for coaching practice.

The EC coaching program is the only Canadian ...

 

Coaching Courses and Upgrades

2019 Continuing Education Opportunities - Equestrian Specific Courses: Competition Coach / Competition Coach Specialist Evaluations

In-competition evaluations are being planned for the summer season. Please call 204-925-5718 or email [email protected] for more details. The season is short: don't let another year pass by.

National Coaching Week happens September 21 - 29, 2019

Fall English Rider Level 6, 7 or 8 Evaluations

Manitoba Horse Council arranges Rider Level evaluations for those competent riders who wish to challenge the Levels prior to going forward to Instructor or Competition Coach/Specialist. If you do not have your own coach who can refer you, please contact [email protected] to find out more. If you are working towards EC certified status, you will also be interested in the Fall Coaching Camp - see below.

Fall Drive Instructor Evaluation - Date tba

New for Manitoba Horse Council is a Drive Instructor Evaluation. This is planned for Fall, and MHC will ...

 

Learn To Ride

What is Equestrian? Getting Started P'tit Trot Program Beginning Riding Lessons English Riding Western Riding Other Disciplines Upcoming Learn to Ride Events

Learning to Ride

So your child loves horses and has expressed a desire to ride? Or maybe you as adult want to start the sport of equestrian and you are not sure where to begin?

You don’t have to incur the expenses of buying and boarding a horse to learn to ride.

Taking lessons at a facility which offers school horses can be the best way for you and yours to begin their equestrian journey.

Choosing a riding facility can seem like a daunting task but there are things you can look for and questions you can ask to help you make an informed decision. Our downloadable Guide for New Riders now available! Click to download PDF version or request a hard copy from the office. Please use the links above to get more information on how to get started on your horse journey... Further questions can be directed to the MHC office at (204) ...

 

What is Equestrian…?

Equestrian is the encompassing term for all activity involving the horse or other equus species (eg. mule). The term equestrian describes both recreational and competitive riders, handlers, and drivers. Equestrian includes all disciplines or activities participated in whilst mounted on the horse, as well as unmounted disciplines or activities. It is the partnership of horse and human and, in some disciplines, horse to horse.

Mounted equestrian disciplines are commonly divided into two categories: English disciplines and Western disciplines. As a general rule of thumb, the classification of English or Western describes the type of “tack” (equipment) used on the horse. The type of tack used is the most easily distinguishable factor in the division of English and Western disciplines. Other disciplines that do not fall under the categories of English or Western include driving, halter (in-hand), and vaulting (gymnastics on horseback).

Certain breeds of the horse are often favored and are more ...

 

Horse Day 2018 a Success!

Manitoba joined the rest of Canada in celebrating the 10th annual Horse Day on June 2, 2018. Over 6,000 people participated and attended 75 Horse Day events from coast-to-coast. For many Canadians, Horse Day is the chance to get up close and personal with a horse for the first time. It’s also the perfect opportunity to acknowledge the important contributions made by horses in our nation's heritage and how people of all ages and experience levels can continue to enjoy horses in sport and leisure. Here in Manitoba, eight organizations took part in Horse Day. MHC stepped up to the mounting block with a photo contest, encouraging people across the province to participate in a Horse Day event and snap a pic for the contest. Nearly 30 people participated and captured beautiful moments with friends, family and – most importantly – horses. The rainy weather didn’t dampen the smiles.

At MHC, we were also smiling ear to ear all weekend – we loved seeing your Horse Day moments. Click ...

 

MANITOBA HORSE COUNCIL ANNOUNCES THE 2016 JUNIOR ATHLETE OF THE YEAR - NICOLE GORITZ

Nicole is a young athlete who is involved in the Arabian show world. She has been involved in show hack, hunter and english competitions. She has competed in Moosejaw, Saskatoon and in Brandon at the Canadian Nationals. She has placed well in all events at the regionals achieving top 6, reserve Champion or Champion status. At the Canadian nationals she was in the top 10.

Nicole's experien ce in riding has not always been easy. When she was six she had a bad experience with a pony and was afraid to get on any horse or pony. It was a couple of years later that a friend encouraged her to try again - and since then there has been no stopping her.

What really encouraged her nominators to put her name forward was the strength of character she has shown in the competition ring. She has demonstrated that she can learn from her experiences and use that knowledge to go on to higher levels of achievement. All of the members of Manitoba Horse Council wish you continued success as you grow and learn in the sport ...

 

Other Disciplines

The Daring of Driving

Driving is an unmounted equestrian discipline in which one or more horses pulls the driver(s) in a carriage. Like all equestrian disciplines, driving can be for recreation and pleasure, or for sport. Competitive driving competitions include four-in-hand, pairs, singles, and tandems. There are 3 types of driving competitions: presentation/dressage, marathon, and obstacle driving. A popular combination of these is called Combined Driving.

Combined Driving is the equivalent to ridden eventing (see English), testing the horse and driver’s courage, stamina, and versatility. The three phases include: Dressage (see above) in which the horse, while pulling a carriage, must demonstrate a series of movements and demonstrate willingness, obedience, balance, and suppleness; Marathon in which there are several phases, including the navigation of obstacles over varied terrain where each obstacle has a start and finish and is timed separately; and Obstacles (cones) in which the carriage, ...

 

Beginning Riding Lessons

WHAT TO WEAR TO YOUR FIRST RIDING LESSON

While it isn’t necessary to go out and purchase a full riding wardrobe for your first lesson, there are a few must haves which will make your experience safe, comfortable and fun.

ASTM CERTIFIED RIDING HELMET

This is the single most important piece of equipment you need to own. Approved ASTM riding helmets must be properly fitted to the rider so they don’t slip or fly off during riding. Riding helmets are designed specifically for riding and the types of injuries a rider could experience. Substituting a non- sport specific helmet such as a hockey helmet is NOT recommended and is to be avoided. Borrowing or purchasing a used helmet which could have structural damage not visible to the eye should be avoided. A reputable tack shop will carry certified helmets and will be able to assist you in selecting a properly fitting helmet.

PROPER FOOTWEAR

While wearing a pair of riding boots is a good idea they are not essential. Wear shoes/boots ...

 

Western Riding

Western riding in North America originated from the Spanish conquistadors in the 17th Century. As the conquistadors traveled to what is now Texas and California, this style of riding began to spread across the continent.

Both equipment and riding style evolved to meet the working needs of the cowboy in the American West. American cowboys needed to work long hours in the saddle over rough terrain, sometimes needing to rope cattle with a lariat (or lasso). Because of the necessity to control the horse with one hand and use a lariat with the other, western horses were trained to neck rein, that is, to change direction with light pressure of a rein against the horse's neck. Horses were also trained to exercise a certain degree of independence in using their natural instincts to follow the movements of a cow, thus a riding style developed that emphasized a deep, secure seat, and training methods encouraged a horse to be responsive on very light rein contact. Though there are significant differences in ...

 

Current Coaches Directory - NCCP

Manitoba Horse Council recommends that you research qualifications of potential coaches before you select one. Manitoba Horse Council implements its coaching program under the instruction and umbrella of the national Equestrian Canada / National Coach Certification Program. NCCP

The National Coach Certification Program (NCCP) is a coach training and certification program for all coaches in nearly 70 sports and is the recognized standard for coach training and certification in Canada. The NCCP is implemented by the Coaching Association of Canada (CAC). It is the only coach program accepted by Coaching Manitoba – the Sport Manitoba unit for coaching in Manitoba – as required under the CAC. Equestrian Canada/NCCP

The Equestrian Canada (EC) coaching program is the nationally recognized certification program for equestrian coaches and instructors, developed in partnership with NCCP, CAC and Sport Canada. Equestrian Canada certification approves and acknowledges equestrian ...

 



Contact Us

Manitoba Horse Council Office
145 Pacific Avenue
Winnipeg, MB, R3B 2Z6
Fax: (204) 925-5703

Executive Director, John Savard
Phone: (204) 925-5719
Email: [email protected]

Business Manager, Linda Hazelwood
Phone: (204) 925-5718
Email: [email protected]

For the duration of the summer, MHC's office will be closed each Wednesday. Normal hours will be resumed September 3. Have a great horsey summer!